Book Review: Why Didn’t They Ask Evans? by Agatha Christie

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Title: Why Didn’t They Ask Evans?

Author: Agatha Christie

Year Written: 1934

Publisher, Year Published: Fontana, 1984

ISBN: 0-00-616606-7

My detective book summer has continued with another crime novel from Agatha Christie, though this time not a Poirot mystery. Why Didn’t they Ask Evans? Is about Bobby Jones, who witnesses someone die, though he is unaware at the time it’s a murder as he thinks he fell off a cliff, but as it’s an Agatha Christie it couldn’t be that simple. It is set in the early twentieth century, I can’t remember a date being mentioned but as it was originally written in 1934 I would assume around then, and is a quiet country setting as with a lot of her books, that hides a story of murder with twists and turns.

This book has been sat in my parents bookshelf so I thought, having enjoyed the other Agatha Christies I’ve read recently, I’d give it a go. It was adapted into a Miss Marple story fairly recently for TV so it may be familiar if you watch the ITV dramas but it’s not originally one of that series. I have to say I didn’t remember the storyline from the TV series so it was like reading it without any previous knowledge which was a bit of a change from the others.

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Book Review: A Meditation on Murder (A Death in Paradise Novel) by Robert Thorogood

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Title: A Meditation on Murder

Author: Robert Thorogood

Publisher, Date: Harlequin MIRA, 2015

ISBN: 978-1-848-45371-5

Until a recent trip to the library I didn’t even know that there were books based on the Death in Paradise TV show from the BBC. As it’s one I love and I’m on a bit of a detective novels kick at the moment I thought I’d give it a go. It’s also the perfect book for the recent heat here in the UK, with its setting of Saint-Marie, a fictional island in the Caribbean. After a bit of a look online it turns out A Meditation on Murder was the first Death in Paradise novel so it’s a great one to start with.

I was interested, going into this, to see how close it comes to the actual TV series and characters, also which of the characters it was written about as there have been a few combinations over the series. Being written by the creator of the show, Robert Thorogood, I was hoping it would be close and, to me, it doesn’t disappoint.

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Book Review: The Labours of Hercules by Agatha Christie

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Another Agatha Christie book, this is from a series of ten that Penguin published that she chose herself as favourites. I already reviewed Death on the Nile, another from this series, and this has the same green cover that the Penguin Crime books do. It’s The Labours of Hercules by Agatha Christie, a book of twelve short stories about Hercule Poirot. Each one is inspired by one of the Labours of Hercules, the classic book about the Greek myths of Hercules.

This edition was published in 1955 (it’s the reprint, he original Penguin was in 1953) but as it’s one of the more well known Agatha Christie books and part of the Poirot series it has been published many times over the years. Hercule Poirot is one of Agatha Christie’s more famous characters and there are TV adaptations of all of the stories, though I don’t remember all of these being made. Each of the stories is short, ranging from around 15 to 30 pages, and covers a wide range of mysteries from dog kidnapping to murder.

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Book Review: Hallowe’en Party by Agatha Christie

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I don’t know why but in the past when I’ve tried to read Agatha Christie books I haven’t got on with then, despite loving the TV and movie adaptations I’d seen, or maybe because of them. However, I started reading some of the ones my parents have last summer and have loved reading them so I thought I’d try one of the ones I know better from TV now that the weather has improved and is better for sitting outside reading.

Hallowe’en Party is a Poirot story, I think he’s probably the most well known of Agatha Christie’s characters though I don’t know how well known her books are outside of the UK. It also has another recurring main character from the Poirot series in Ariadne Oliver, a crime novelist who comes up with unlikely answers to solve the crimes and is pretty much the opposite of the quiet, methodical Poirot when it comes to questioning. The book revolves around the murder of a young girl at a Halloween party whete Ariadne is a guest and so she brings Poirot in.

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Book Review: Five on Brexit Island

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Title: Five on Brexit Island

Author: Bruno Vincent

Year written: 2016

Publisher and year: Quercus, 2016

ISBN Number: 978-1-78648-384-3

I think I first heard of this book on a livestreams the Yogscast did in December and wanted to get it since then so, as I was already making a Paperchase order, it ended up in my bag. It’s £7.99 from Paperchase (though I found it for under £4 on Amazon) and a hardback which surprised me as most of the Famous Five books I grew up with are paperback. It’s the latest in the Famous Five for grown ups series, at least I’ve seen it called that even if it’s not the official name, and it’s Five on Brexit Island by Bruno Vincent.

I’m not sure how much of a thing the Famous Five, or Enid Blyton in general, is outside of the UK and if it’s even something that people still read here but I grew up reading them. It’s a very British series of books, I think Enid Blyton books are in general, where four children and their dog Timmy go for adventures. I think they’re fairly tame by today’s standards for adventure stories, they’re set in the fifties I think or maybe the sixties, and they always seem to find a friendly farmer who gives them free food and drink. One of them, a girl called George has an island off the coast of England, the kind with a nice ruin and plenty of secret tunnels and caves for adventure, which is where this story is set.

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Paperchase Haul

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When I made this order I started out planning to get three or four things but my basket kind of grew. It turned into a bit of a mix of everything really, though since taking photos I have a feeling that quite a few bits may be used in future photos, even though only one or two things were bought for this. I never thought I’d be buying things to use as props but I want to work on my photography for my blog so have been browsing more home decor sections and it’s very hard not to buy a load of things I don’t need to decorate my room.

This haul is from Paperchase, I think most of this is available in a lot of their stores, even the smaller one near me has quite a bit of this, but it is all still available online. I do love their stationery and always go to them when it comes to Christmas decorations but I haven’t really looked at them for décor and I could have bought a lot more.

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I Can’t Get Rid of Books

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I was planning on doing a decluttering post for my books, I’ve been going through them and sorting out which to keep and I realised I don’t get rid of books, though I probably should for quite a few of them. I have managed to get a few that I’m either selling, passing on to people I know will like them or keeping for the next charity shop run.

For some reason I just find it hard to get of books. I also seem to buy more than I read and get rid of. Last year I made a list of books I wanted to read though I didn’t get through most of them. This year I decided to go through and get rid of the ones I don’t think I’ll be reading again and make a pile of ones I haven’t read but I’m not that likely to keep beyond that.

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Book Review: Bumper Book of Unuseless Japanese Inventions by Kenji Kawakami

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The book I’m reviewing today is one I actually was recommended on a design course. I’m sure about 90% of books from degree courses that are more specific to the topic get sold in or donated to charity shops after the course, I know that’s what I’ve intended for mine, but I found myself picking this one up when I was thinking about getting rid of it and reading through it all again. It’s the Bumper Book of Unuseless Japanese Inventions by Kenji Kawakami with a foreword by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall.

I think it’s the kind of book that’s actually interesting and entertaining for a variety of reasons, probably one of the ones that will draw people in is that wtf Japan? side of it that the internet seems to love. This book is full of 200 unuseless inventions, it combines two books that were originally published separately, and has photos alongside a bit of an explanation on what everyday problem they are trying to fix. These are all inventions designed to fix something, however they do end up causing more problems or embarrassment through using them, that is what makes them unuseless. It’s what makes them Chindogu, which is essentially a unuseless product and a word I had never heard of before this book.

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Book Review: Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

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I’ve recently been making my way through a list of classics I’ve always wanted to read but never had but I decided to start off 2017 with one that I loved when I read it before to see if I still enjoyed it ten years later. Great Expectations is that book that you studied at school, the one you pick apart and analyse every other word so if it survived that and made me want to read it again in the past I thought it would be worth reading again, especially as I got the Penguin Clothbound Classics version last year. This has an RRP of £14.99 though it seems to vary in price, WH Smith currently have a lot of the Clothbound Classics at £10.49.

One thing I like about these Clothbound Classics is the little extras added in that add context, whether it’s the author’s life or what was happening at the time in the world in general. I know these aren’t necessary to enjoy the story but I think of them a bit like those extras you get in DVDs that are fun to read if you want but can also be ignored. If you want the ISBN number and details of this exact edition I’ve put them at the end.

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Book Review: Red Nose Day Colouring Note Book

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I realise that this year I haven’t actually done that well when it comes to actual book reviews, I will admit my first book of the year has proved a longer read than I expected. Today’s book review is kind of a mix of a notebook and a colouring book and has been sold in TK Maxx in partnership with Comic Relief with a portion of the money going towards the charity as with the rest of the range. This product donated £2 of the £5.99 to the charity.

This year’s Red Nose Day collection at TK Maxx is based around photographs by fashion photographer Rankin. They’re all photos if abimals, though they’re either dressed up or have a red nose added in afterwards. The majority are black and white with one in colour, which lends itself to a colouring in book as you can give them the traditional colours or go pop art and bright colours. These are all available exclusively at TK Maxx, though I think the books and other more home products are also available at Home Sense, their home and lifestyle stores, and is available online here or in stores.

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